Past work

In my former work as an academic medical historian, I was interested in understanding how ideas about mental illness developed over the last century – and in particular, why it is that mental illness has been so heavily associated with women.  I have questioned the extent to which mental disorders are a ‘female malady’, suggesting our ideas have been heavily influenced by unhelpful assumptions about gender. My more recent work explored the under-researched topic of male mental health – a subject with important contemporary resonance, given that the suicide rate in men is three times that of women. 

Here are links to my past books:

 
A History of Male Psychological Disorders in Britain 1945-1980  (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015)

A History of Male Psychological Disorders in Britain 1945-1980 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015)

 
Desperate Housewives, Neuroses and the Domestic Environment, 1945-1970  (Pickering and Chatto, 2012)

Desperate Housewives, Neuroses and the Domestic Environment, 1945-1970 (Pickering and Chatto, 2012)

Chapter 7, ‘Preventing male mental illness in postwar Britain’.

Chapter 7, ‘Preventing male mental illness in postwar Britain’.

 

Other publications:

Men, mental illness and suicide: the current scene in historical context, History and Policy (June 2016)

 Men, mental health and suicide in the UK: The importance of the long view, History and Policy (November 2015)

 

‘Gender, stress and alcohol abuse in post-war Britain’, in Mark Jackson (ed.) Stress in Post-War Britain, 1945-85 (Pickering and Chatto, 2015)

Looking back: Masculinity and mental health - the long view, The Psychologist (June 2014)